Moos: Film Review

Moos (2016)
Jewish Film Festival
Malco Grandview, Madison MS
January 28,2017 7pm

 

Moos is a romantic comedy that follows a young woman through her many misadventures in life. The film opens on her singing while ironing clothes. It then cuts to her assisting her widowed father with mundane tasks such as clipping his nails as they prepare for a Hanukkah feast with their relatives. Before the dinner, Moos is reunited with her childhood best friend Sam who had been living in Israel for 15 years. After being the only one ignored during the Hanukkah toast, Moos announced that she would be auditioning for theatre school.

When she fails to get into theatre school, she tells her father and Sam that she did after overhearing her father voice his concern that her audition would be a brave failure. She instead works at the theatre school’s cafeteria, making friends with a guy who was accepted into the program. The voice teacher who showed interest in her at her audition, invited her to his house for one voice lesson after she helped him with his tire. She began to have relations with this teacher, not telling her father or Sam of him or her rejection from the program.

When her father and his new girlfriend decide to attend a public performance at the theatre school, they learn that Moos is not a student and is instead a cafeteria worker. Her voice teacher publicly denounced her, officially ending their “relationship.” After laying in the bed moping, Moos decides to mend her relationships with her father and Sam, who she had blamed for everything wrong in her life. Her father accepted, but Sam left and went back to Israel. Although saddened by her inability to apologize to Sam, Moos continued to live her life.

In the last moments, Daniel, a family friend, had his Bar Mitzvah. Sam showed up to support his friend during this nervous time.  Moos eventually got the chance to apologize to Sam after she mastered singing the song that resulted in her rejection from the theatre school. Moos decided to audition again, and this time she was accepted. Moos finally accepted this feelings that Sam had for her and the movie ended with the title “Sam and Moos”

Although the film started off slow with awkward cuts of Moos, the editing throughout the rest of film seemed continuous. I noticed that Jos Goshalk, decided to use music to drive the plot. Throughout most of the film, happy and upbeat music was used to show how fun everyday life was. In the sad moments, slower music played. It seemed as if music aided the storytelling because it moved the audience to feel what the director wanted.

Before the show one of the co-chairs of the film festival noted that the director called Moos, the story of everyday people living their everyday lives. That’s what it is. Although there were times when the terminology alienated the non-Jewish audience, it did not make the movie experience unwatchable. I thoroughly enjoyed the movie. It was a fun movie with a cute character arc and narrative. Although it was a bit formulaic, it was a light-hearted film that had characters that even I as a non-Jewish non European woman could connect to. I would recommend this movie for anyone over the age of 18 as the movie does contain some graphic scenes. Moos is a fun way to spend a Saturday night.

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